Remodeling Credentials Decoded

If you have ever received an email from Paul Morse, you’ve probably noticed that he has an alphabet soup of letters after his name.


Paul Morse, Morse Constructions, Bostonto

 

 

 

Paul Eric Morse
GCP, CGP, UDCP, CAPS, CR

 

 

 

 What do those designations mean? Here’s a quick explanation:

GCP: Green Certified Professional

Paul was the second person in the country and the first in New England to be named a Green Certified Professional (GCP). He went on to facilitate the certification study group for about two years.

The National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) established the Green Certified Professional (GCP) designation to promote the highest standards of green remodeling through credentialing of remodeling professionals. GCP remodelers have passed an extensive exam to demonstrate a solid understanding of the critical issues related to Green Remodeling.  The exam covers 16 subject areas including Building Science, Indoor Environmental Quality, and Renewable Energy Applications to name a few.  The requirements to sit for the exam are five years in the remodeling industry, 16 hours of Green or Sustainable Remodeling/Building continuing education hours, and agreement to uphold the NARI Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

CGP: Certified Green Professional

Didn’t we just talk about this? No, this is a different designation from the National Association of Homebuilders (the other one was NARI) that recognizes builders, remodelers and other industry professionals who incorporate green building principles into homes— without driving up the cost of construction. Extensive classwork leading to the designation provides a solid background in strategies for incorporating green building principles into homes using cost-effective and affordable options. To earn your CGP designation, you must pass an exam and complete 12 hours of continuing education every three years from building industry-related educational activities. A minimum of eight hours is required to come from green building industry-related educational activities.

Paul is one of about 50 builders and remodelers in Massachusetts to have received this designation.

CAPS: Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist

The Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) program was created by the NAHB Remodelers of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) in collaboration with Home Innovation Research Labs, NAHB 50+ Housing Council, and AARP. The program's goal is to help remodelers meet the needs of mature clients who wish to age-in-place, which means living in your home safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of age or ability level.

A CAPS has received advanced training in the unique needs of the older adult population, aging-in-place home modifications, common remodeling projects and solutions to common barriers. As with all of these certifications, participants must pass an exam before becoming a CAPS.

Morse Constructions is also a member of the National Aging in Place Council.

UDCP: Universal Design Certified Professional

NARI developed the Universal Design Certified Professionals (UDCP) designation to promote standards of universal design and remodeling through credentialing of design and remodeling professionals. A Universal Design Certified Professional handles renovations that make the home livable for anyone who wishes to move about his/her house freely, without barrier and without creating an "institutional" look. Families who have members with special needs also benefit from a UDCP. The UDCP designation is granted to individuals who have completed coursework and passed a rigorous exam about universal design principles. 

CR: Certified Remodeler

Paul has been a Certified Remodeler (CR) for about two decades. CR is a NARI designation indicating that the person is a professional remodeler who provides a full range of remodeling services. Certified Remodelers have passed an exam and demonstrated skill and knowledge in a broad range of business management and technical skill areas.


For more information about our certifications, please check out our Certifications & Memberships Web page or give us a call at 617-666-4460.

Tags: Boston renovation, Boston home renovation, Paul Morse, Boston remodeling

How to Plan a Successful Renovation

What's the #1 renovation mistake? We feel it is not allowing enough time for careful planning.

Planning is essential for a project that stays on schedule, within budget, and successfully transforms your home. Upfront planning includes: Planning a Successful Renovation guide

  • Considering function and aesthetics for the renovation
  • Creating a master plan for this and future renovations
  • Establishing a realistic budget
  • Understanding local building and historic commission regulations
  • Designing a renovation that achieves your goals within your budget
  • Selecting finishes, hardware and other items
  • Setting realistic schedules

To find out more, please read our free guide on planning a successful renovation. You may download the 8-page PDF guide at the link below.

If you have questions or would like to discuss a possible project, please email Paul or call us at. Now is the perfect time to plan your summer renovations!

 

Download Planning a Successful Renovation

 

 

Tags: renovation ideas, renovation guides, renovation ebooks, Massachusetts renovation